Daily News

Alcohol and dementia risk: A complex relationship

Although alcohol has been popular for millennia, and dementia is increasingly prevalent, scientists are yet to understand the relationship between the two. A recent study sets out for answers. With dementia predicted to affect 13.9 million adults in the United States by 2060, understanding why these conditions develop is more urgent than ever. Scientists have uncovered certain factors that increase the risk of developing dementia. Some, such as advancing age, cannot be prevented. However, it is possible to avoid other potential risk factors, such as smoking tobacco. It is essential to identify modifiable risk factors as understanding these could help prevent or delay the onset of dementia. Recently, researchers designed a study to look for links between dementia and alcohol consumption in older adults. They published their findings in JAMA Network Open. In conclusion, the current study provides few solid answers. It confirms, however, that the relationship between alcohol and dementia is complex and likely to require a great deal more research. (Credits: www.medicalnewstoday.com)

Link found between chronic headache and back pain

A review of 14 studies found that people with persistent headache or back pain were twice as likely to experience the other disorder as well. Chronic headaches and persistent back pain are both debilitating conditions. New findings suggest a link between the two, potentially charting a new course for more effective treatment. Chronic headaches and back pain both appear in the top five causes of years lived with disability. Healthcare professionals often treat the conditions separately, but there is a theory that in some people, they appear together. Therefore, treating both as one disorder may provide better results. Up to 4% of individuals in the global adult population have headaches on 15 or more days of every month, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Meanwhile, about 80% of adults experience low back pain at least once in their lifetime, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and approximately 20% of these people go on to develop chronic low back pain. In 2013, a German study found a link between low back pain and both chronic migraine and chronic tension-type headaches. Now, researchers from the University of Warwick, United Kingdom, appear to have found an even stronger association. (Credits: www.medicalnewstoday.com)